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The IU community will miss these six long-serving faculty members who are retiring from full-time teaching. They reflected upon their favorite lessons to teach and accomplishments they achieved, and they glowed about the students who make them proud.

 

 

David Brennan, Ed.D.

David Brennan, Ed.D.

Education Professor
Director of Student Teaching
Years at IU: 19

You have to find out who is sitting in front of you. When I was a young teacher at a Catholic high school, one of my students was falling asleep in class, and I found out it was because he worked all night to pay tuition. That woke me up.

As teachers, we need to find out what students’ strengths and weaknesses are. I tell my students, “I’m sure you’ll be teaching. But will your students be learning?” Keep a portfolio on every kid. Assess where they are so you can bring them to the next cognitive level.

I’m retiring from full-time teaching, but I’ll continue to serve as director of student teaching. I get emails from them all the time saying, “I was hired!” and “I’m taking the theories you and others taught me into my classroom.” These students have all brought their special talents to IU and to me personally. I learn from them and use examples from what they have done. They made me a better teacher. Immaculata has been the highlight of my 45 years of teaching.


Jed Yalof, Psy.D.

Jed Yalof, Psy.D.

Psychology Professor,
Psy.D. Program Director,
Psychology and Counseling Chair
Years at IU: 37

My favorite subject matter to teach is explaining Freud and operationalizing what are often densely abstract constructs and encouraging students to appreciate the role of the unconscious in shaping perceptions of self and others. The more comfortable you are with yourself, the better you’re able to teach. I learned a lot about myself by studying and self-supervising my teaching style. I also taught good students, which required me to be very clear, fair and open-minded in listening to their feedback. They made me look (and look, and look…) at my actions and long-term influence on their careers, directly and indirectly.

I had a great experience with my doctoral research, which allowed me to see things in myself and integrate ideas at a higher level. I hope the same for my students. If they could feel as good about their education and training as I did, that’s all I could ask for.


Sister Elaine Glanz, IHM, Ph.D.

Sister Elaine Glanz, IHM, Ph.D.

English Professor
Faculty Emerita
Years at IU: 25

One thing I’ve taught that I would love for students to remember—aside from how to use a semicolon!—is the joy of reading good literature. There is nothing more relaxing than a good book. My favorite classes center on ancient and medieval literature. I’ll continue to teach one or two courses a semester, and having more time will allow me to go deeper into those areas.

Many of my students are memorable, but Kimi Fox really made an impression on me. Kimi used a wheelchair and faced many challenges, but she never missed anything. She was so active on campus! She even practiced on stage with her sorority sisters for Greek Week competition. Kimi has since passed away, but I think she influenced many people while she was here.

My highlight at IU has been meeting young people who have studied with me and then moved onto bright futures. In a sense, a teacher gets to share in her students’ future.


Sister Kathleen Doutt, IHM, D.M.A.

Sister Kathleen Doutt, IHM, D.M.A.

Music Professor
Faculty Emerita
Years at IU: 38

What a gift and privilege to play, sing and teach music! The inexplicable JOY of the “first art”/“gift of the gods” intensifies spirituality and levels of consciousness at the core of my being as a religious and an educator!

Joy and passion for music and scholarship energize me. Research in education and Latin American folk music brings rich experiences and membership in a marvelous network of musician/scholars!

Director of Music Education, I taught and mentored students from pre-service training to post-graduation employment. Teagle-sponsored research provided opportunities to spearhead and continue the IU faculty Academy for Metacognition. My work as Pi Kappa Lambda Regent promotes student musicianship and scholarship. I recently helped to establish a PKL Award for Exceptional Achievement in Scholarly and Creative Work. The selected papers and musical compositions are posted on the website. While engaged in these activities, I was the recipient of the PMEA Citation of Excellence Award and the IU Lindback Distinguished Teaching Award.

Music teaching and study require persistence and life-long musicianship development. Opportunities to accompany, attend and present at conferences, explore sound and video editing, and promote equity and inclusion in music are exciting and challenging!


Barbara Gallagher, M.Ed.

Barbara Gallagher, M.Ed.

Assistant Professor
Exercise Science
Years at IU: 33

At first I didn’t intend to stay at Immaculata very long, but it was just a really nice place to work. I stayed for 33 years, a third of IU’s history—that’s a little scary!

I was asked to create an exercise science major, which started with four girls and has grown to about 140 students and three faculty. I like to explain how stress affects the body and share stressors I have experienced. Exercise helps you control some of those stressors. One student said, “Thanks for giving me some tools to help me.”

After I lost my daughter to leukemia, some days it was hard going to work. But driving onto campus, I always felt a sense of peace, because I knew people there cared for me. Colleagues organized fundraisers in memory of Caroline. All the prayers and support—I could never repay that.

I encourage students to work for their dreams—it doesn’t just happen! Our students have been successful, getting jobs and going to graduate school for physical and occupational therapy. I love it when they stop by or send me an email.


Joseph Pugh, D.M.

Joseph Pugh, D.M.

Assistant Professor
Business Administration
Years at IU: 21

In my Leadership Dynamics course, I teach students something I learned as an Army officer: “mission first, people always.” An effective leader strikes a balance. Tasks and relationships are not diametrically opposed. They must go hand in hand. An effective leader builds close relationships with followers, who are then willing to put forth effort, even when the going gets tough.

I enjoy meeting with students about their research projects. My job is to encourage them and offer guidance on how to go about the research and structure the report. Some students don’t know what to research, so I sound them out on their work in their major and their career goals. I love the expressions on their faces when the light bulb goes on and they have something to be enthusiastic about. I like to think that I’ve helped them to develop and exercise their conceptual skills.

One particularly creative student in my Business Seminar course came in on Halloween dressed as me. I never laughed so hard in my life. I still have the photo of her.